Thursday Evening Artist Talks

7.30pm - 9.00pm

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Catriona Coultar
'From Seashore to Cyanotype'
21.10.21

 



Cat works in Fife and London. She creates assemblage sculpture and original prints from found objects, notably plastic marine debris. This is used either as raw materials in compositions or transformed into cyanotype prints. Cat's work is inspired by the rising levels of plastic pollution on the beaches near her studio in Scotland and in the Thames. Her materials and themes are dictated by the tides and our times. Lockdown restrictions have led Cat to concentrate on cyanotype photograms in 2020/21, with a particular focus on the environmental impact of the 'new normal'.
 

Her work transforms waste plastics into deceptively beautiful but dystopian images which invite the viewer to consider the impact of our throwaway society on the marine environment.
 

Cat has made art for many years whilst pursuing a variety of other occupations before finally prioritising her art practice in 2019.
 

Cat is proud to be an artist member of ArtCan, an international, non-profit organisation supporting working artists, SplashTrash, Visual Artists Association and East Neuk Open Studios.

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Jan Nelson 

'A Journey into Art' 
18.11.21

 



November ‘21 Jan is a mainly self-taught artist, apart from 3 years study with the Open College of the Arts and has been painting for over 25 years.

 

Jan works full time from her studio in the lovely East Neuk of Fife and with the sea nearby her painting can be combined with her other great love of sailing. She makes regular trips around the coast of Britain and particularly to the West Coast of Scotland both for sailing and to observe the changing scenery and find new ideas for her work. Although the majority of Jan’s work relates to the sea, she is also an accomplished landscape painter where a passion for nature comes to the fore, particularly in her floral works.

 

Jan’s paintings are as much about the paint as the picture – the paint is laid on thickly so that it catches the light and adds extra depth. This style of painting helps to capture the tremendous movement, thrills and glorious colours of sailing, both in a scenic and racing sense.